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List of all Humanities for All Project Grants

HUMANITIES FOR ALL PROJECT GRANTS

GRANTS AWARDED IN WINTER 2017

1500 STORIES: GIVING VOICE TO ECONOMIC INEQUALITY

Foothill-De Anza Community College District, Los Altos Hills
Project Director: Dr. Jennifer Myhre
1500 Stories is a cooperative art and storytelling project that aims to focus public attention on the chasm between the rich and poor in the U.S. through storytelling and the humanities. Inspiration for the project came from a poster created by economist Dr. Stephen J. Rose depicting the current distribution of income and wealth in the U.S. (at present, the poster would need to be 1500 stories tall– roughly five miles long– to capture the disparity in income between the bottom tier and richest 1% of the population). The project will develop an interactive website that marries quantitative data about economic inequality with video, audio and photo stories of what it is like to live at different economic positions in America. A series of face-to-face forums and facilitated conversations in San Jose will provide opportunities for learning and dialogue among a diverse group of residents of Silicon Valley. $20,000

GROWING JUSTICE: RAISING THE VOICES OF UNDERSERVED YOUTH TO BUILD A CULTURE OF HEALTH

Community Agroecology Network, Santa Cruz
Project Director: Dr. Roseann Cohen
Growing Justice: Raising the Voices of Underserved Youth to Build a Culture of Health is a community-based and youth-led participatory project that empowers Pajaro Valley Latinx youth, of mostly farmworker families, to produce knowledge and tools that promote cross-cultural and intergenerational understanding and about the interrelated challenges of food insecurity, substandard housing, and neighborhood safety. The goal of the project is to foster a more inclusive community in a region deeply shaped by the inequities of the industrial food system. This project will present a mobile exhibition for display in community gardens and host community dialogues with residents. The exhibit and products resulting from the community conversations will be digitized and archived in an open-access online digital story map. $19,000

LITTLE MANILA RECREATED

University of the Pacific, Stockton
Project Director: Dr. Joshua Salyers
The University of the Pacific, in collaboration with the Filipino-American National Historical Society (FANHS) and Little Manila Foundation, will create a virtual reality museum exhibit, website, and mobile app game to digitally reconstruct the now-demolished Little Manila neighborhood in Stockton, California and interpret its significance as a center of regional and national Filipino-American culture.  Little Manila Recreated brings the lost history of Stockton’s Little Manila, once the largest concentration of Filipinos outside of the Philippines, to life using digital humanities tools.  By virtually placing players in the shoes of mid-twentieth-century Filipino immigrants who forged a vibrant ethnic enclave in the face of discrimination and oppressive working conditions, the exhibit/game forges ties between past and present immigrants, while historicizing the effects of immigration policies and city planning decisions on community cohesion.  Fourth grade curriculum development and teacher outreach will encourage use of the game in conjunction with the Common Core California History curriculum  immigration strand. $15,000

LITTLE SAIGON MOBILE MUSEUM

Media Arts Center San Diego, San Diego
Project Director: Mr. Ethan van Thillo
Little Saigon Mobile Museum will provide the means to capture and share the stories of Vietnamese refugees and immigrants who make up San Diego’s designated Little Saigon Cultural District located in City Heights, the most diverse community in San Diego, where over 30 languages are spoken. The project will support the creation and display of artworks representing residents’ living histories, provide professional training to youth facilitators in visual art forms and interviewing techniques, facilitate inter-generational learning experiences with community-based storytelling workshops, and create exhibits and mobile installations. Refugees and immigrants will contribute first-hand accounts of their experiences, explore the role the U.S. played in their emigration/immigration, and reflect on how they identify with both their old and new homes. $15,000

OUR GIANT ROCK: A COMMUNITY TOUCHSTONE IN THE MOJAVE

Town of Yucca Valley, Yucca Valley
Project Director: Ms. Karyl Newman
The Hi-Desert Nature Museum in Yucca Valley will develop Our Giant Rock: A Community Touchstone in the Mojave, a multimedia project incorporating a digital touch screen exhibit and related public programs exploring the relationship of the distinctive local landmark to the history and histories of our community.  The project will demonstrate how a geological formation can become an intermediary, a hub for honoring Mojave heritage by connecting stories, characters and events. The project will keep an array of cultural memories accessible and enable community members and visitors to gain deeper understanding and appreciation of the human condition. $16,000

TAKING FLIGHT: CONVERSATIONS IN AND ABOUT THE OAXACAN LANGUAGES OF THE CENTRAL COAST

Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz
Project Director: Professor Maziar Toosarvandani
Tens of thousands of immigrants from the Mexican state of Oaxaca have settled in the Central Coast of California in recent decades. It is less well-known that Oaxaca is home to a truly diverse array of indigenous languages, many threatened by the disruptions of migration. Taking Flight will invite the Central Coast community to discover, explore, and practice the Oaxacan languages now spoken in their midst through a collaboration between the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Cruz and Senderos, a multiservice community nonprofit in Santa Cruz County. Programming will emphasize interactive activities that immerse participants in indigenous languages, including language games at local cultural festivals, performances of important literary works, language learning classes, and online presentation of oral histories and narratives. $15,000

TELL ME

Glendale Library, Arts & Culture, Glendale
Project Director: Mrs. Lora Martinolich
The Glendale Library, Arts & Culture staff will work with immigrants, local restauranteurs, culture bearers and educators to identify, interview, record and make available oral histories of Glendale’s diverse immigrant populations. ReflectSpace, a gallery of the Downtown Central Library, will offer multi-media exhibits featuring the oral histories of Glendale settlers and immigrants, including the Shoah Foundation’s oral history collection of Glendale Armenian Genocide survivors previously recorded by photographer Ara Oshagan. A community festival will provide another opportunity for sharing immigrant cuisines and cultural traditions, as well as to collect new stories from community members through the means of a mobile recording booth. And a partnership with the Glendale School District will provide opportunities for student learning. $20,000

THE CHICHARRÓN CHRONICLES: POST-COLONIAL SPANISH LEGACIES IN CONTEMPORARY HISTORIC FILIPINOTOWN

Pilipino Workers Center of Southern California, Los Angeles
Project Director: Ms. Reanne Estrada
The Chicharrón Chronicles: Post-Colonial Spanish Legacies in Contemporary Historic Filipinotown is a participatory exercise in public story-gathering and narrative collage: a series of three screening/story-gathering events that will yield community-generated content for an eponymous multimedia walking tour that illuminates the historical, social, and cultural commonalities between immigrants from the Philippines, countries of Central America, and Mexico in one Los Angeles neighborhood. Teasing out the bonds that can form over fried pig skin (chicharrón), Catholicism, and overlaps in language and labor struggles, the project will draw on history, inquiry, and analysis to engage participants in communal investigation and relevant, significant dialogue co-facilitated by local culture bearers and humanities scholars. $15,000

THE WONDERLAND RADIO HOUR: LIVE FROM THE RIO THEATER

KRCB-Rural California Broadcasting Corporation, Rohnert Park
Project Director: Ms. Rhian Miller
The Wonderland Radio Hour: Live From the Rio Theater will create a series of public programs at the historic Rio Theater to showcase musicians, artists, writers and characters from the Lower Russian River Area. Anchoring each hour will be three professionally produced audio stories highlighting: A Person, A Place and A (bit of) History from each of the eight distinct communities that lie along the Russian River as it turns and heads west toward the sea. Driving west on Hwy 16/River Road, as you enter Monte Rio, a neon sign suspended above the road greets you– “Welcome to Vacation Wonderland.”  The series will bring together onto the stage and into the audience, members of every lower river community, from Forestville to Jenner-by-the-Sea. Each show aspires to introduce and appreciate the wide and diverse talents of our residents– from the well-known to those whose abilities deserve greater recognition.  $20,000

WELCOME TO THE MIX: RECOVERING THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF SAN DIEGO’S DIVERSITY

San Diego History Center, San Diego
Project Director: Dr. Tina Zarpour
Welcome to the Mix, a community-based research project, will collect personal interviews and video-taped oral histories and photographs from four communities currently under-represented in the museum’s collections, programs, and exhibitions: Native (Kumeyaay and Luiseno), Mexican-American, Filipino, and various refugee groups. These materials will be developed into a new 480 square-foot multimedia exhibition of the same name at San Diego History Center in Balboa Park, as well as a derivative traveling exhibit component that will travel to four community spaces throughout San Diego County. Exhibition materials also will be incorporated into a new permanent exhibition at the History Center. The overarching goals of the project are to broaden and diversify the current oral history collection, making it more accurate and representative, engage new audiences and program participants and to strengthen the institution’s interaction with the diverse communities of our region. $20,000

GRANTS AWARDED IN SPRING 2017

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS: UNTOLD STORIES OF REFUGEES FROM LAOS (B2W)

Center for Lao Studies, San Francisco
Project Director: Vinya Sysamouth
This project, through personal interviews, artifacts, and photographs, will produce a traveling interpretive exhibit illuminating the histories and contemporary realities of refugees from Laos (ethnic Lao, Mien, Khmu, and Hmong) and their families now living throughout California. Accessible in multiple languages, the exhibit will travel to the SF Bay Area, Redding, Sacramento, Fresno, and San Diego over a period of 18 months. $10,000

DREAMING THE UNIVERSE: THE INTERSECTION OF SCIENCE, FICTION, & SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Pasadena Museum of History, Pasadena
Project Director: Jeannette O’Malley
This project will explore the history of science fiction from 1930 to 1980, and how it interacted with advances in science, changes in technology, and shifts in American society. The exhibition will feature historic artifacts, fine and graphic art, books and ephemera, and historic photographs. Oral histories of science fiction creators will be shared via audio kiosks installed in the galleries. A series of lecture/panel discussions, free public programming including several community days, and free field trips for fourth grade students will engage visitors in related topics. $10,000

FROM LATIN AMERICA TO HOLLYWOOD: LATINO FILM CULTURE IN LOS ANGELES, 1967-2017

Academy Foundation/Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Project Director: Randy Haberkamp
This nine-part weekly series of live English and Spanish-language film screenings and live-streamed filmmaker panel discussions will be the Academy’s contribution to the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, Latin American and Latino Art in Los Angeles. The project will include dedicated online content, an academic symposium, a companion publication, and K-12 materials. Supported by a two-year research phase, the project examines the shared influences of Latino and Latin American filmmakers and the work they created or presented in Los Angeles, told through the voices of the filmmakers themselves. $10,000

INDIGNITY: A COMMUNITY NARRATIVE-BASED EXHIBITION BY THE CSUSB ANTHROPOLOGY MUSEUM

California State University, San Bernardino, San Bernardino
Project Director: Annika Anderson
California State University, San Bernardino’s (CSUSB) Anthropology Museum is curating a community narrative-based exhibition about the experiences of marginalized populations. The stories might include experiences with ableism, androcentrism, Islamophobia, cisgenderism, Eurocentrism, racism, heterosexism, educationalism, ageism, classism, colorism, pro-natalism, and other axes outside of the societal “norm.” The stories will make clear both the persistence of inequalities and biased normative standards in our communities – often in subtle and unintentional ways – and their impacts on individual lives. $15,000

MI FAMILIA, MI HISTORIA

The New Children’s Museum, San Diego
Project Director: Judy Forrester
“Mi Familia, Mi Historia” will employ a series of humanities-based activities to provide new community engagement and learning opportunities for low-income Latino families living near the U.S.-Mexico border. This project  intends to make museum and university culture more accessible and to make the humanities an integral part of long-life learning for underserved Latina/o families.  Programming will include family workshops, oral history recording and digital mapping, interpretive art-making, family fieldtrips, public community discussions, and an exhibition of completed artwork. $20,000

PUNJABI AMERICAN WOMEN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT: A PUBLIC HISTORY COLLABORATION BETWEEN UC DAVIS AND THE PUNJABI AMERICAN HERITAGE SOCIETY

Regents of the University of California, Davis,
Project Director: Nicole Ranganath
This project will be the first study to preserve and share the life histories of women in the historically significant Punjabi American community in California’s Sacramento Valley. In collaboration with female community experts, UC Davis historians will interview 36 Punjabi American women in the remote rural Yuba City area and record 12 women performing Punjabi folk songs about important life cycle events. The project is part of a robust, long-standing partnership between UC Davis and Yuba City’s Punjabi American Heritage Society. The videotaped interviews, photographs, and transcripts will be shared with researchers and audiences worldwide via the existing UC Davis Pioneering Punjabis Digital Archive. $15,000

REAL VETERANS. REEL STORIES

San Francisco State University, San Francisco
Project Director: Daniel Bernardi
To facilitate greater dialogue and understanding between veterans and civilians, the Veteran Documentary Corps (VDC) at San Francisco State University will organize a series of screenings using seven short films produced by veteran-filmmakers, each profiling a single veteran, on five different California State University campuses: San Diego, Los Angeles, Fresno, Monterrey Bay, and Sacramento. Each screening will be followed by a question and answer session with both filmmakers and veterans, facilitated by Dr. Daniel Bernardi, VDC Director, humanities scholar and veteran. $15,000

SACRED ART IN THE AGE OF CONTACT

Santa Barbara Historical Museum, Santa Barbara
Project Director: Lynn Brittner
This grant will support Santa Barbara Historical Museum’s upcoming exhibit and related programming, “Sacred Art in the Age of Contact.” This exhibit, including 70 artifacts of Chumash art (some never before on display), explores Spanish influence on Chumash works of religious art from the middle of the 18th century. The exhibit will be complimented with lectures and programming to encourage public engagement with history; all lectures will be provided free of charge. This exhibit will be presented in partnership with UC Santa Barbara as part of the Getty Imitative, Pacific Standard Time. $14,500

SAN FRANCISCO ACT UP ORAL HISTORY PROJECT

GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco
Project Director: Joseph Plaster
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society (GLBTHS) will chronicle and publicize the history of San Francisco’s AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) through a wide scale oral history project; an exhibit incorporating high-quality radio documentary-style “audio portraits,” photos, and other materials; a multi-media web-based component; and a series of culminating events offering opportunities for dialogue and debate. Through partnership with a local GLBT youth center, young GLBT people (18-25) will be trained to conduct oral histories as part of the project. $10,000

SOMETHING FROM NOTHING: ART AND HANDCRAFTED OBJECTS FROM AMERICA’S CONCENTRATION CAMPS

The University of San Francisco, San Francisco (Bay Area)
Project Director: Shirley McGuire
“Something from Nothing: Art and Handcrafted Objects from America’s Concentration Camps,” includes an exhibition, educational materials and tours, and public programs presented by the Thacher Gallery at the University of San Francisco (USF) in collaboration with the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) from August 21 through November 5, 2017. The exhibit will feature handmade artifacts created by Japanese Americans sent to the American concentration camps during WWII. The two public programs include an expert and survivor panel discussion on social justice and legal issues related to Executive Order 9066, and an arts-focused event featuring poets, writers, and visual artists whose work explores the legacy of the camps. Additionally, the aim is to engage USF’s Asian American and first generation college student communities, the broader San Francisco/Bay Area Japanese American community, the Bay Area arts community, and members of the general public. $20,000

STRAIGHT OUTTA FRESNO: FROM POPPING TO B-BOYING AND B-GIRLING

California State University, Fresno Foundation, Fresno
Project Director: James Marshall
“Straight Outta Fresno: From Popping to B-boying and B-girling” seeks to radically alter the relationship between academia and the general public by creating a new model for how archives are created and how historical knowledge is disseminated. Building on their work from the Fall of 2016, Fresno State historians and graduate and undergraduate students will work with community partners to host four events related to the history of hip hop dance and culture in Fresno from the late 1970s to the early 2000s. $15,000

VISUALIZING LANGUAGE: OAXACA IN L.A.

Library Foundation of Los Angeles, Los Angeles
Project Director: Kenneth Brecher
Between September 2017 and January 2018, the Library Foundation of Los Angeles will present “Visualizing Language: Oaxaca in L.A.”, a visual art exhibition and 50+ public programs celebrating the rich social fabric of Los Angeles through the lens of the city’s vibrant Oaxacan community.  Project aims are to engage new audiences from immigrant communities with the Library’s resources, explore identity and culture as reflected in the Los Angeles’s diversity, and introduce compelling indigenous artists from Mexico and California to a wider audience. $20,0000