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Priscilla Yanez, WWII Telephone Monitor, upper left

In Plain Sight: Mexicano | Chicano Stories in San Diego

LA JOLLA–This exhibition explores the intertwined history of Mexicans, Mexican-Americans, and Chicanos as contributors to San Diego’s rich cultural, political, and military history in the 20th century; narratives that have previously been unexamined or overlooked.

Exhibit Dates: February 10, 2018 – May 20, 2018

Hours: Wed- Sundays 12pm – 4pm 

La Jolla Historical Society
780 Prospect Street
La Jolla CA 92037
https://lajollahistory.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/

 

The intertwined history of Mexicans, Mexican-Americans, and Chicanos as contributors to San Diego’s rich cultural, political, and military history in the 20th century has often been hidden, overlooked, or forgotten. This exhibition brings together narratives concerning the history of Mexicano individuals and families in La Jolla, Lemon Grove, and Logan Heights/Barrio Logan, documenting their roles in building communities and their contributions to the complex and diverse civic life during three critical periods: the 1910s-1930s era; the World War II era; and the 1960s and after. Focal points include the stories of La Jolla’s Pottery Canyon ceramics factory and the Rodríguez family; and Roberto Álvarez, the protagonist in the first successful desegregation in education case in the United States, the Lemon Grove Case. The exhibition will also explore Mexicano participation and contributions to San Diego’s military history during World War II, the post-war Civil Rights and Labor movements, and the development of Chicano Park and its designation on the National Register of Historic Places. Also included is the story of Dr. Ramon Ruiz; native San Diegan, WWII veteran, inaugural chair of UC San Diego’s history department, and 1998 honoree of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional dimensions of the project include commissioned works by contemporary Latinx artists reflecting on the cultural and social issues raised by the narratives, including migration, identity, labor, racism, and civil rights; a student photography project; and a showing of the awarding-winning documentary The Lemon Grove Incident by Paul Espinosa.  ADA accessible.

The project is made possible with support from California Humanities, a nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities through an Humanities for All Quick Grant.  Additional support provided by Ruth Covell, Nell Waltz, and by the Florence Riford Fund of the San Diego Foundation.

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